luxury water

Diamond gearshifts and luxury water…

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

Two followups–

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One: what goes perfectly with your diamond-encrusted Mercedes-Benz SL Roadster? Why, a diamond-studded gearshift knob of course! I’m not sure where this is from or who the target audience is, though I don’t think the producer/seller is trying to go extraordinarily upscale when he or she writes ‘For all you ballers out there… “What’s your braggin’ right???”‘ on the display placard. The shifter features 30 carats of ‘genuine’ diamonds and 10 ounces of 18-carat white gold. I’d be interested to see how high (or rather low) the quality of the diamonds is.

konanigari

And two: following up on another luxury peculiarity we’ve been following: this week another luxury water was brought to my attention, perhaps the most expensive yet. Kona Nigari water, a desalinated water high in minerals from the deep seas off Hawaii, costs $16.75 per ounce. Granted, this is for a bottled water “concentrate” one is meant to add to regular water, so it costs a bit less in drinkable form–but $2144 for a gallon of concentrate seems a bit expensive to “make” a beverage that is available free nearly everywhere and isn’t supposed to have a strong flavor. The sea water in the concentrate is believed to be free from pollution and bring with it health benefits. Whether it’s worth it is of course up to those who choose to buy it, though recent news suggests that people are beginning to think more sensibly about the value of bottled water. Last month PepsiCo was forced (through pressure from environmental and political groups) to clearly state on each bottle of its Aquafina water that it’s only purified tap water. Does this mark the beginning of the end for luxury waters? Perhaps.

[via blogiseverything and Lussorian]

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Luxury water bar Via Genova

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

blingh2o

When we mentioned fancy and expensive waters on Janus Thinking before, I hoped it was marking a trend (spending posh amounts on a common commodity) in decline, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. This week Luxist brought to my attention a luxury water bar in Chappaqua, New York. Via Genova is an ‘eclectic cafe and ultimate hydration station’ that offers over 50 different waters, with names like Apollinaris, Badoit, Speyside Glenlivet, and Vichy Catalan. They hold water tastings and do weddings, and if you spend over $2000 on a water event, you get ‘a free gift of bling!’.

There will always be people willing to spend more than others, but as in my previous post I question the extent to which one can be a connoisseur of water–yes, mineral contents and carbonation and will differ, but the base product remains essentially free and it’s difficult for the average person to discern the extremely subtle differences in waters. By offering a free gift of bling(!) for high rollers, Via Genova seems to be targeting conspicuous spenders more than water appreciators.

Are people getting fleeced (or in this case soaked) by operators like Via Genova? Luxury remains irrespective of price and can be anything that fulfills the needs of the consumer, but I do question the need to spend $55 for a bottle of crystal-covered ‘Bling h2o.’

Janus Thinking says of this article...

"Ice" and Water

Two followups— One: what goes perfectly with your diamond-encrusted Mercedes-Benz SL Roadster? Why, a diamond-studded gearshift knob of course! I’m not sure where this is from or who the target audience is, though I don’t think the pr…

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The rising popularity of water connoisseurship

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

water_20hose_small

Is bottled water something that can be appreciated in the same way as fine wine or fine art? That’s what a new book, “Fine Waters: A Connoisseur’s Guide to the World’s Most Distinctive Bottled Waters” suggests (website here). According to the author, Michael Mascha, water connoisseurship is a rising trend. There are over 3000 different brands of bottled water, differentiated by varying levels of total dissolved solids, pH and hardness.

I am not a water connoisseur; the rising popularity of water connoisseurship suggests that it could be the case that people are actually appreciating different types of water. But water is nearly free out of the tap, where it is subject to stringent quality guidelines. It’s *very* difficult for the average consumer to discern differences in water. And bottled water is a massively profitable industry—I’m not sure whether to give fancy water brands kudos for creating demand through impressive branding or be skeptical of them as charlatans pandering to people with more money than sense. See below:

[via Wine Enthusiast Magazine]

Gilbert says of this article...

I appreciate a nice bottle of water, but some of my fondest memories are playing in the yard and drinking out of that garden hose.

Janus Thinking says of this article...

All Wet?

When we mentioned fancy and expensive waters on Janus Thinking before, I hoped it was marking a trend (spending posh amounts on a common commodity) in decline, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. This week Luxist brought…

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