holidays

Part of the MarcFam Family

Isaac Mostovicz writes that the MarcFam campaign by luxury brand Marc Jacobs is a good example of brands building an online relationship with their customers...

Luxury brand Marc Jacobs is connecting with consumers through a campaign which encourages sharing images and videos, for the chance to receive branded prize.

Marc Jacobs MarcFam

Marc Jacobs MarcFam

The MarcFam campaign sees both brand and user created content sitting side by side on the website, which is released into social media, email and web outlets. Consumers can add images with the hashtag #MarcFam to Twitter or Instagram posts for the chance of winning Marc Jacobs goods.

The campaign sees branded videos of Marc Jacobs employees exchanging and opening gifts, such as sunglasses.

Marc Jacobs sunglasses

Marc Jacobs employee receives sunglasses

Each product is then labelled with its price and name, so consumers can go and buy it.

Marc Jacobs sunglasses labeled

Marc Jacobs sunglasses

A Marc Jacobs spokesperson said:

“Marc Jacobs Intl. is a brand full of eccentricities. Through our social channels, our fans reach out to us in ways that reflect our own eccentricities. We wanted to hear their stories and see their photos that illustrate those stories. We love integrating social media into our business as a way of fostering relationships with our customers online. In this case, #MarcFam takes those online relationships offline and into the real world.”

I have written previously about the need for luxury marketers to develop relationships with their customers and encouraging consumers to behave according to their own personal values. This campaign is a good example of a luxury brand taking insights about its consumers and using them to develop a two-way dialogue with them, allowing them to “add to the world of Marc Jacobs on their own terms”.

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New trends in luxury travel

Isaac Mostovicz writes that about the rise of luxury holidays...

China, India and Russia will account for a progressively larger percentage of worldwide luxury travellers, according to this recent article in Travel Weekly.

As younger luxury travellers tend to favour authenticity and adventure over opulence as they reject rigid sets of planned activities – something I have written about in the past as appealing to Lambda personalities – nature-oriented destinations such as New Zealand, and culturally vibrant places such as Peru will gain popularity, alongside “traditional” accommodation such as Yurts and eco-lodges.

Destinations in Europe are proving popular too, with over 40 per cent of all luxury travellers saying that their next destination would likely be in Europe, with France and Italy high on the list – destinations which would likely appeal to more traditional Theta personalities.

A report by the International Luxury Travel Market claimed that around two-thirds of luxury travellers make at least four trips a year, lasting on average ten days. Around one per cent of the world’s hotel rooms qualify as ‘luxury’, where room rates are approximately four times that of a chain like Hilton, so it is perhaps not surprising that over half of luxury travellers are between 45 and 54 years old, and earning at least $100,000 a year.

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