Christmas

Part of the MarcFam Family

Isaac Mostovicz writes that the MarcFam campaign by luxury brand Marc Jacobs is a good example of brands building an online relationship with their customers...

Luxury brand Marc Jacobs is connecting with consumers through a campaign which encourages sharing images and videos, for the chance to receive branded prize.

Marc Jacobs MarcFam

Marc Jacobs MarcFam

The MarcFam campaign sees both brand and user created content sitting side by side on the website, which is released into social media, email and web outlets. Consumers can add images with the hashtag #MarcFam to Twitter or Instagram posts for the chance of winning Marc Jacobs goods.

The campaign sees branded videos of Marc Jacobs employees exchanging and opening gifts, such as sunglasses.

Marc Jacobs sunglasses

Marc Jacobs employee receives sunglasses

Each product is then labelled with its price and name, so consumers can go and buy it.

Marc Jacobs sunglasses labeled

Marc Jacobs sunglasses

A Marc Jacobs spokesperson said:

“Marc Jacobs Intl. is a brand full of eccentricities. Through our social channels, our fans reach out to us in ways that reflect our own eccentricities. We wanted to hear their stories and see their photos that illustrate those stories. We love integrating social media into our business as a way of fostering relationships with our customers online. In this case, #MarcFam takes those online relationships offline and into the real world.”

I have written previously about the need for luxury marketers to develop relationships with their customers and encouraging consumers to behave according to their own personal values. This campaign is a good example of a luxury brand taking insights about its consumers and using them to develop a two-way dialogue with them, allowing them to “add to the world of Marc Jacobs on their own terms”.

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Holiday Spending Outlook

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

image

With Thanksgiving behind us and the holiday season in full swing, it’s time for the pundits to start guessing whether overall holiday spending will be lavish or more measured given recent difficulties in the mortgage and housing markets. Recent research from Deloitte in the UK suggests that consumers are going to still spend, especially on luxury goods, but may pay for it (metaphorically and actually) in the new year. According to this FT report, in a survey of 1000 adults in the UK, Deloitte found:

  • Consumers intend to spend 7% more this year on Christmas gifts, socializing and food and drink than last year.
  • 19% of consumers intend to purchase a designer handbag or shoes.
  • Price is a less important consideration for shoppers; only 20% of consumers listed price as a main reason for choosing a particular store (it was 37% in 2005 and 23% in 2006); “value for money” also declined.
  • 62% of shoppers choose a store based on “convenience” (from 50% in 2005)

Deloitte says this is evidence of our so-called “cash rich, time poor” society, and I have to agree.

But back in the US, willingness to spend might not be as great. Despite reports of decent Black Friday earnings, this week NPR reported that the Consumer Confidence Index dropped to 87.3, down from 95.2 in October and the lowest since October 2005 (following Hurricane Katrina and rising gas and oil prices).

Rosalind Wells, chief economist for the National Retail Foundation, said:

With the weak housing market and current credit crunch, consumers will be forced to be more prudent with their holiday spending.

Even with the credit crunch, I’m not so sure people will actually be more prudent–if they have a line of credit they’ll use it to purchase expensive gifts they don’t see as optional.

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Slip into something comfy…

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

Are these ‘USB SLIPPERS’ via spluch – the ultimate piece of crass Christmas giving, or a legitimate form of luxury?

usbslipper
Who cares. They look hilarious…

Jack Yan says of this article...

I think the former evaluation is correct, but then, I live within 40 miles of Chloë, the pseudo-New Zealand celebrity who was known for her fluffy slippers and turned off most New Zealanders to them since.

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