Serving the married couple

Isaac Mostovicz writes...

In my previous article I discussed De Beers’ new initiative that targets the married couple. However, while this approach is new to De Beers, my partner Randy Pearson and I have claimed for years that the married couple is the natural customer for diamonds.

Recently, we created a boutique operation, Kahro Diamonds in Raleigh North Carolina that is exclusively designed for the married couple. I am aware that not everyone can visit us and learn first-hand how to serve the married couple. Therefore, I created a short list of ideas that might help my colleagues serving the married couple better. The most important point to keep in mind in the following is that the married couple has needs that are fundamentally opposed those of the engagement ring customer.

  1. Don’t educate. Listen! Since the introduction of the faulty 4C’s concept the sentence every diamond customer will constantly hear is “you need education”.  My dear colleagues, stop educating your customer and feeding him faulty information. He is already educated. All you need to do is to listen to him. The customer knows what he wants and needs – though most of the time, his language is different. Listen to him and try to understand what he wants.
  2. Find out the job of the diamond! As Professor Clayton M. Christensen puts it, customers want to “hire” a product to do a job. Figure out what job the diamond is being hired for. A customer who looks to propose marriage is looking for a diamond to do a totally different job than the one who hires a diamond to celebrate his mutual bond with his spouse. Do you know what job the married couple is hiring their diamond for? Do you know how to satisfy that precise need?
  3. Don’t confuse the customer! Remember that the customer is looking for one diamond only. Why do you confuse him with an endless list of diamonds that even you don’t really know how to choose from? Why confusing him with the useless letter soup that the 4C’s approach entails? Why depend on diamond “certificates” that don’t certify anything, especially when the paper contains a lot of meaningless information? By the way, do you know what is essential and what is superfluous on the diamond grading report? Spend as much time as necessary to figure out, together with your customer, what diamond you should look for to satisfy his needs.
  4. Don’t run a circus! I am referring here to the visual aspect of any typical jewelry store. Usually, jewelry stores heavily invest in the show. They tend to be large, with a lot of merchandise on display and, the owners hope, crowded. These stores are noisy, both aurally and visually, and make the customers feel as if they are in a jewelry-story version of the three-ring arena of Barnum & Bailey. They don’t know which show to watch and adding to confusion, all three rings seem to offer a similar show. Noise and glitter might appeal to those whose communication style is shouting over the noise of the dancing floor. Married couples look for a relaxed, quiet and warm venue. Can you create this atmosphere in your store?

Kahro Diamonds follows these guidelines and more. After all, it does serve the married couple. My best advice is to visit this boutique operation in Raleigh, North Carolina. Simply contact Kahro Diamonds at Raleigh@kahrodiamonds.com or 919- 649-6528. But, if you cannot pay a visit, at least you should think on how to apply these rules in your store. It took us years to fine-tune our strategy. You should start revisiting your approach now.

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